Blog Search Results Loading...

Listening...

[stop listening]

Search elsewhere: WebpagesBlogMembers

Show Search Hints »


121 results for part one found within the Blog

6 displayed out of 121 (0.10seconds)

Page 4 of 21

Should Christians get tattoos, and is it Biblical?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 31st August 2019 in Tattoos | tattoos,church history,Basil the Great,Leviticus,Old Testament
I was in a discussion not so long ago about tattoos, and I was asked about the historical view on this practice. It wasn’t something I had looked into before from a Church Fathers point of view, so it was an interesting topic of study. In my searching, I found this article from a Catholic site which seems to give a pretty interesting overview of some of the views about tattoos in the earlier centuries. The following is a quote about a Church Council in the context of native Britons, who still practiced tattooing at that time for pagan ritual, something which Tertullian also gives a fleeting reference to around 213 AD in his On the Veiling of Virgins, ch. 10....
 

Creedal Christians: The Nicene Creed

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 2nd June 2019 in Early Church | nicene creed,nicea council,creeds,creedal christians,creedal
The Nicene Creed — what is it and why is it called that? This creed gets its name from a time and place: the first ecumenical Church council held at Nicaea, which is now known as İznik in northwestern Turkey, in 325 AD. Now that may raise another question for you: what is an ecumenical council? Well, to explain more about the Nicene Creed, we are going to have to take a look at The First Council of Nicaea in order to better understand why this creed was written. First things first though; an “ecumenical council” is ideally a Church-wide meeting where all the Bishops from all across the Church come together to hold a very large and very important meetin...
 

On the Feast of the Nativity, a sermon by Leo the Great

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 22nd December 2018 in Christmas | nativity,christmas,xmas,leo the great,sermon
In the days leading up to Christmas, I wanted to share a sermon from a man known as Leo the Great (aka Pope Leo I), who was a Pope from 440-61 AD. He was one of the most significant and important men in Christian antiquity, as he tried to combat the heresies which seriously threatened church unity in the West, such as Pelagianism. This sermon of his about the incarnation of Christ and what it means for us has always stuck with me since I first read it last April when writing my own book on the Early Church Fathers. It's not that long, so take the time to read it through and let the words sink in as we prepare for Christmas to remember and celebrate the birth...
 

The Coming of Jesus: The Olivet Discourse – part 1

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 19th October 2014 in Second Coming Series | Second Coming,Return of Christ,Return of Jesus,Preterism,Prophecy,Last Days,Left Behind,Eschatology,Matthew 24,Olivet Discourse,birth pangs,Josephus,history
Hello again, it's been a while since I've wrote anything, and longer since getting back to this series on the Second Coming of Jesus. This isn't for lack of motivation, but rather because this is such a huge topic that I've been reading and thinking about this next part for a very long time to make sure I know what I'm saying, and am well read enough to do the topic justice. Having said that, there will always be far more to say on this than I can give time for here, but I hope to give enough of an overview to expound this prophecy faithfully without being too technical as to cause confusion! You can also catch up on the previous parts...
 

Does Christmas have pagan origins?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 19th December 2019 in Christmas | christmas,xmas,origins,pagan,pagan roots,church fathers,church history,Saturnalia,Epiphany,Annunciation,Tertullian,Origen,john chrysostom,incarnation,liturgical calendar,church calendar,festivals
For most people, the question of the origins of Christmas is probably far from their minds. Some may recognise and give a cursory glance towards the Biblical narrative on the birth of Jesus as something to do with it (although a 2017 study showed that almost 1 in 20 Brits thought Easter was the birth of Jesus!);—but in some Christian circles the question (accusation?) that “Christmas is pagan” is at the forefront of their minds. Table of Contents When was December 25th celebrated? The Christian Calendar Concluding Thoughts Bonus Information Further Reading & Sources: As time goes on and we move further and further into the future,...
 

Raised in the Heavenlies!

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 27th March 2016 in Easter | resurrection,Jesus,new birth,new life,born again,baptism,spiritual resurrection,physical resurrection,glorified bodies,third day,Easter,easter sunday
Easter is upon us once again! Lent is over, Good Friday has passed and now the time for mourning and fasting is complete. It's a time to feast, a time to remember and celebrate the resurrection of Christ as we look forward to our own final resurrection!But what really is the resurrection? How will we be resurrected, and what does it mean for us that Jesus rose again? Let’s explore what this means for us as Christians, and see what the Scriptures say. The resurrection is spiritual! That heading may cause some reading this to question me, but do read on – this is actually what the New Testament teaches us (though not only this type of resurrection). Many ti...
 
First Page | Previous | 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 ...of 21 | Next | Last Page