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Lent Day 40: Leo the Great: Sermon LXXII: ON THE LORD'S RESURRECTION, II

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 15th April 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Doctor of the Church,lectures,Leo the Great,St Leo,Pope Leo I,sermon,resurrection,easter,easter sunday
...nt of the sin which has passed upon all men”, that taint being “weakness and mortality, which were not sin, but the penalty of sin”. The “Redeemer of the World” suffered these things for our sake, “that they might be reckoned as the price of redemption”. In us is the “heritage of condemnation”, but in Christ is the “mystery of godliness” (1 Tim 3:16) Through the enemy, Jesus had “His spotless flesh” tortured. Because of this, because Jesus willingly went to die for us, now “believers in Him might find neither persecution intolerable, nor death terrible, by the remembrance that there was no more doubt about their sharing His glory th...
 

On the Feast of the Nativity, a sermon by Leo the Great

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 22nd December 2018 in Christmas | nativity,christmas,xmas,leo the great,sermon
...In the days leading up to Christmas, I wanted to share a sermon from a man known as Leo the Great (aka Pope Leo I), who was a Pope from 440-61 AD. He was one of the most significant and important men in Christian antiquity, as he tried to combat the heresies which seriously threatened church unity in the West, such as Pelagianism. This sermon of his about the incarnation of Christ and what it means for us has always stuck with me since I first read it last April when writing my own book on the Early Church Fathers. It's not that long, so take the time to read it through and let the words sink in as we prepare for Christmas to remember and celebrate the birth...
 

Lent: Day 16 - Justin Martyr: First Apology, Chaps. 48-59

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 18th March 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Justin Martyr,apologetics
...Day Sixteen: St. Justin Martyr: First Apology, Chaps. 48-59 Who: Justin Martyr was a Philosopher who converted to Christianity and became a tireless evangelist and apologist. Justin wrote more Christianity than any other person prior to his time. He is classified herein as Eastern, since he a native of Samaria and his thought patterns were Eastern. However, he spent the last years of his life in Rome, where he was executed as a martyr (c. 165). What: An apologetic (defence) essay to explain what Christians believe and do. Why: Justin is demanding the Emperor to investigate accusations and unjust persecution against Christians so that they at least may face...
 

Lent Day 18: Cyprian: On the Unity of the Church: 1-9

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 21st March 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Cyprian,Bishop of Carthage,unity
...onsidered sin and blasphemy by the Church, though many felt regret and wanted to be forgiven and restored. “But how can a man say that he believes in Christ, who does not do what Christ commanded him to do?” Cyprian argues, since the faith of many had become weak. It is not “persecution alone that is to be feared”, Cyprian writes, since “caution is more easy where danger is manifest” but to be all the more vigilant in times of peace because the enemy “creeps on us secretly” in sneaky ways, which is why he has earned the name “Serpent”. Novatian rose up as an “antipope” (someone who rejected the people's choice of pope) and caused a s...
 

Was the omniscience of God a developed idea?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 21st April 2014 in The Nature of God | progressive revelation, Christocentric, Christotelic, Hermeneutics, omniscience, omnipresence, theology
...Or do we retroactively place our current theology of God on God? Consider the Garden of Eden: '[T]he Lord God called to the man, and said to him, “Where are you?”'  (Gen. 3:8-10) Now today we make it into a rhetorical question, but was this always so? In this story, God is spoken of almost in a physical-bodily sense as walking in the garden, since "they heard the sound of the Lord God walking in the garden" as he moved about, and then tried to hide themselves from his view! Next think of the tower of Babel - "The Lord came down to see the city and the tower, which mortals had built" (Gen 11:5) - Did he not just know already? Also this story...
 

Lent Day 30: Cyril of Jerusalem: Catechetical Lectures: Lecture XIX

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 4th April 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Doctor of the Church,lectures,liturgy,catechism,Bishop of Jerusalem
...sed under sin. “Now turn from the old to the new, from the figure to the reality” The old, in Moses, prefigured the new, in Christ, who is the reality we now live in. The enemy of old in the person of Pharaoh, chased the Hebrews to the sea, and even through it, but was engulfed when it closed in around him now prefigures what happens in baptism: The tyrant of old was drowned in the sea; and this present one disappears in the water of salvation. Personally, I really like that analogy and I’ve never heard it put that way before. The phrases which the converts have to recite remind me of the liturgy which you have to say during a Christening. That in...
 
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