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Lent Day 28: Athanasius: Life of Anthony: Chaps. 71-80

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 1st April 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Athanasius,Bishop of Alexandria,Confessor,Doctor of the Church,Anthony the Great,miracles,Greek Philosophy,demons,healing,deliverance,the cross,foolishness of the cross
Day Twenty-eight: St. Athanasius: Life of Anthony: Chaps. 71-80 Who: Bishop of Alexandria; Confessor and Doctor of the Church; born c. 296; died 2 May, 373 AD. He was the main defender of orthodoxy in the 4th-century battle against the Arianism heresy. Certain writers received the title “Doctor” on account of the great advantage their doctrine had on the whole Church, Athanasius especially for his doctrine on the incarnation. What: The biography of Anthony the Great’s life, which helped to spread the concept of Christian monasticism, particularly in Western Europe. Why: From the letter’s own prologue: “The life and conversation of our holy Father...
 

What did Jesus actually sacrifice?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 18th March 2018 in Lent | Jesus,Jesus death,sacrifice,Jesus sacrifice,atheist,meme,flogging,crucifixion,Godhead,eternal consequences
Sometimes the question, or accusation/criticism maybe, is posed by atheists and critics of Christianity that Jesus didn’t really sacrifice anything because he is God and also because he got his life back three days later. So where’s the sacrifice if you know that what you give up will be given back, and given back even better than you previously had it? It’s an interesting question, and one that should cause us to stop and think about what we, as Christians, say to non-believers in case the question is ever given to us. Most people will say Jesus  gave up his life for us – but is that such a big deal if he knew he’d have it back in three days; and th...
 

Creedal Christians: The Nicene Creed

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 2nd June 2019 in Early Church | nicene creed,nicea council,creeds,creedal christians,creedal
The Nicene Creed — what is it and why is it called that? This creed gets its name from a time and place: the first ecumenical Church council held at Nicaea, which is now known as İznik in northwestern Turkey, in 325 AD. Now that may raise another question for you: what is an ecumenical council? Well, to explain more about the Nicene Creed, we are going to have to take a look at The First Council of Nicaea in order to better understand why this creed was written. First things first though; an “ecumenical council” is ideally a Church-wide meeting where all the Bishops from all across the Church come together to hold a very large and very important meetin...
 

Who is the New Jerusalem?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 6th January 2016 in Second Coming Series | Revelation,New Jerusalem,The Church,Holy City,Early Church,Early Church Fathers,Eusebius,Origen,Barnabas,millennium,millennial reign,1000 years,New Heaven and Earth
This is a sort of ‘addendum’ to the Revelation Fulfilled? article    Yes you read the title correct: WHO (not what) is the New Jerusalem?   To answer this, you must ask yourself: who is the Bride of Christ?   If you answered “the Church” (as in, the body of believers, not buildings) then you’d be correct as they are both one and the same!   Roughly 1500 miles square.   Maybe you’ve always wondered why the Church is called the “bride”? Well, let’s examine some Scriptures and see! 2 Corinthians 11:2I feel a divine jealousy for you, for I promised you in marriage to one husband, to present you as a chaste virgin to Chris...
 

Lent: Day 5 - Ignatius to the Ephesians

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 6th March 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Ignatius of Antioch: Letter to the Ephesians,Ignatius
Day Five: St. Ignatius of Antioch: Letter to the Ephesians (full text) Who: Ignatius converted at a young age and later became Bishop of Antioch. A friend of Polycarp and fellow disciple of John, there is a long standing tradition that Ignatius was the child that Jesus held in his arms and blessed in Mark 10:13-16 What: The letter has a strong call to and for unity within the church, along with respect for their bishop. Why: Ignatius wrote a series of letters to the churches in Asia Minor whilst en route to Rome to face martyrdom by wild beasts in the Colosseum around 108 AD. When: Around 107-108 AD There is a strong theme to this letter from the outset, an...
 

Lent: Day 16 - Justin Martyr: First Apology, Chaps. 48-59

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 18th March 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Justin Martyr,apologetics
Day Sixteen: St. Justin Martyr: First Apology, Chaps. 48-59 Who: Justin Martyr was a Philosopher who converted to Christianity and became a tireless evangelist and apologist. Justin wrote more Christianity than any other person prior to his time. He is classified herein as Eastern, since he a native of Samaria and his thought patterns were Eastern. However, he spent the last years of his life in Rome, where he was executed as a martyr (c. 165). What: An apologetic (defence) essay to explain what Christians believe and do. Why: Justin is demanding the Emperor to investigate accusations and unjust persecution against Christians so that they at least may face...
 
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