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129 results for early church fathers found within the Blog

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Does Christmas have pagan origins?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 19th December 2019 in Christmas | christmas,xmas,origins,pagan,pagan roots,church fathers,church history,Saturnalia,Epiphany,Annunciation,Tertullian,Origen,john chrysostom,incarnation,liturgical calendar,church calendar,festivals
For most people, the question of the origins of Christmas is probably far from their minds. Some may recognise and give a cursory glance towards the Biblical narrative on the birth of Jesus as something to do with it (although a 2017 study showed that almost 1 in 20 Brits thought Easter was the birth of Jesus!);—but in some Christian circles the question (accusation?) that “Christmas is pagan” is at the forefront of their minds. Table of Contents When was December 25th celebrated? The Christian Calendar Further Reading & Sources: As time goes on and we move further and further into the future, away from the initial events of the firs...
 

Fasting: A spiritual and physical discipline

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 27th May 2019 in Fasting | fasting,didache,discipline,self control,Lent,early church,early church fathers
The topic of fasting often comes up in online discussion groups that I'm a part of, more often in Protestant circles where the practice is more often sidelined in low churches. So let's take a look at the practice of fasting from a practical and historical view, as it seems to be a spiritual discipline which has been pushed aside in many churches today, with prayer, worship and bible reading taking more precedence in a Christian's life instead (not that those are bad things to do!). Why fast? There are many reasons to fast, and recent studies have shown a lot of health benefits that can be derived from fasting. But on the spiritual side of life, there are also...
 

Why Read The early church fathers?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 8th December 2017 in early church | church history,daily devotional,daily reading,early church,early church fathers,new book,amazon
Why read the early church fathers? Maybe for some of you reading this, the question might better be phrased as: who are the church fathers? No doubt you will be familiar with some of their names: Augustine, Jerome, Clement, Ignatius, Polycarp, Justin Martyr et al. You may have even read portions or quotes by some of these men. But that still doesn't really explain to you who they are and why you should care, much less actually read any of their works. My new book deals with a selection of some of the most influential early church fathers, sometimes also referred to as the Apostolic fathers (if they lived between AD 70-150), or collectively as the Ante Nicene...
 

Francis Chan turns towards a more historical and ancient view of Communion

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 14th January 2020 in General Interest | eucharist,communion,francis chan,church fathers,church history,controversy
If you follow certain Christian blogs, or have Christian friends on Social Media, then you may have seen a short video clip being shared which has been taken from a recent sermon by popular Evangelical pastor/speaker and author, Francis Chan of Crazy Love ministries. Depending on who shared the clip will depend on which reaction you have seen; some are praising his words, others fearing for his future calling it a “red flag”. And all of this over a short statement he made about communion! I recommend you watch this 3 minute clip below before continuing, if you haven’t seen it already. I would also recommend watching the whole 47 minute sermon for some b...
 

Lent Day 18: Cyprian: On the Unity of the church: 1-9

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 21st March 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Cyprian,Bishop of Carthage,unity
Day Eighteen: St. Cyprian: On the Unity of the church: 1-9 Who: Third century bishop of Carthage (in modern Tunisia), and martyr from Africa What: A letter to encourage the unity of the church against schisms and heresy during massive Roman persecution Why: A disturbance had happened in the church because of a priest called Novatian — a schismatic of the third century, and founder of the sect of the Novatians. Cyprian wrote to counter this and argues that there can only be one united church, and the Novatian breakaway was a false church and that Novatian was an antipope.When: Around 249 AD You can find today’s reading on page 92 here: lentfatherscomplete...
 

Who is the New Jerusalem?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 6th January 2016 in Second Coming Series | Revelation,New Jerusalem,The church,Holy City,early church,early church fathers,Eusebius,Origen,Barnabas,millennium,millennial reign,1000 years,New Heaven and Earth
This is a sort of ‘addendum’ to the Revelation Fulfilled? article    Yes you read the title correct: WHO (not what) is the New Jerusalem?   To answer this, you must ask yourself: who is the Bride of Christ?   If you answered “the church” (as in, the body of believers, not buildings) then you’d be correct as they are both one and the same!   Roughly 1500 miles square.   Maybe you’ve always wondered why the church is called the “bride”? Well, let’s examine some Scriptures and see! 2 Corinthians 11:2I feel a divine jealousy for you, for I promised you in marriage to one husband, to present you as a chaste virgin to Chris...
 
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