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9 results for nicea council found within the Blog

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Creedal Christians: The Nicene Creed

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 2nd June 2019 in Early Church | nicene creed,nicea council,creeds,creedal christians,creedal
The Nicene Creed — what is it and why is it called that? This creed gets its name from a time and place: the first ecumenical Church council held at Nicaea, which is now known as İznik in northwestern Turkey, in 325 AD. Now that may raise another question for you: what is an ecumenical council? Well, to explain more about the Nicene Creed, we are going to have to take a look at The First council of Nicaea in order to better understand why this creed was written. First things first though; an “ecumenical council” is ideally a Church-wide meeting where all the Bishops from all across the Church come together to hold a very large and very important meetin...
 

Who was the real Santa Claus?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 17th December 2018 in Christmas | christmas,xmas,St Nicholas,early church,nicea council,father Christmas,santa claus
It's that magical time of year when the lights go up, the trees get decorated and a familiar bearded man in a red suit pops up everywhere. He goes by a few names: Santa Claus, Father Christmas, Saint Nick. But who was the real Santa Claus? Well, to answer that, we need to go way back in history to the fourth century to a Bishop called Nicholas of Myra (present-day Demre, Turkey). Memes abound about St Nicholas and Arius Some early lists place him as one of the Bishops who attended the First council of Nicaea in 325 AD, and there are some questionable legends which states that he was temporarily defrocked (a removal from office) and imprisoned during...
 

Should Christians get tattoos, and is it Biblical?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 31st August 2019 in Tattoos | tattoos,church history,Basil the Great,Leviticus,Old Testament
I was in a discussion not so long ago about tattoos, and I was asked about the historical view on this practice. It wasn’t something I had looked into before from a Church Fathers point of view, so it was an interesting topic of study. In my searching, I found this article from a Catholic site which seems to give a pretty interesting overview of some of the views about tattoos in the earlier centuries. The following is a quote about a Church council in the context of native Britons, who still practiced tattooing at that time for pagan ritual, something which Tertullian also gives a fleeting reference to around 213 AD in his On the Veiling of Virgins, ch. 10....
 

Great Lent

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 13th February 2016 in Fasting | Lent,Easter,Fasting,Prayer,early church,early church fathers,paganism,pagan roots
Fasting A spiritual and physical discipline   Update 2018: I recently published a book called 40 Days with the Fathers, which is a daily reading plan and an introduction to the Early Church Fathers that is spread across forty days, originally written as a Lenten reading plan. You can get a copy by clicking here. Lent 2016: Lent is upon us once again! Even though we are already four days into the fast (according to Western tradition) I thought it’d be good to write something on the discipline of fasting. And, much like any major holiday, there is the usual arguments and accusations about how it's all just pagan festivities with a "Christian mask". Eas...
 

Lent: Day 5 - Ignatius to the Ephesians

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 6th March 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Ignatius of Antioch: Letter to the Ephesians,Ignatius
Day Five: St. Ignatius of Antioch: Letter to the Ephesians (full text) Who: Ignatius converted at a young age and later became Bishop of Antioch. A friend of Polycarp and fellow disciple of John, there is a long standing tradition that Ignatius was the child that Jesus held in his arms and blessed in Mark 10:13-16 What: The letter has a strong call to and for unity within the church, along with respect for their bishop. Why: Ignatius wrote a series of letters to the churches in Asia Minor whilst en route to Rome to face martyrdom by wild beasts in the Colosseum around 108 AD. When: Around 107-108 AD There is a strong theme to this letter from the outset, an...
 

Why Read The Early Church Fathers?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 8th December 2017 in Early Church | church history,daily devotional,daily reading,early church,early church fathers,new book,amazon
Why read the Early Church Fathers? Maybe for some of you reading this, the question might better be phrased as: who are the Church Fathers? No doubt you will be familiar with some of their names: Augustine, Jerome, Clement, Ignatius, Polycarp, Justin Martyr et al. You may have even read portions or quotes by some of these men. But that still doesn't really explain to you who they are and why you should care, much less actually read any of their works. My new book deals with a selection of some of the most influential Early Church Fathers, sometimes also referred to as the Apostolic Fathers (if they lived between AD 70-150), or collectively as the Ante Nicene...
 
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